Share/Like This Page

Common Core Standard CCRA.L.3 Questions

Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

You can create printable tests and worksheets from these questions on Common Core standard CCRA.L.3! Select one or more questions using the checkboxes above each question. Then click the add selected questions to a test button before moving to another page.

1 2 3 4 5
Grade 6 Sentence Structure CCSS: CCRA.L.3, L.6.3, L.6.3a
Which sentence is a simple sentence?
  1. We like to eat cheese.
  2. We like to eat cheese, although some cheeses are disgusting.
  3. In the mornings, we like to eat cheese on our eggs and toast.
  4. In the mornings, before we go to school, we like to eat cheese.
Grade 5 Writing CCSS: CCRA.W.5, CCRA.L.3, W.5.5, L.5.3
The passage below is a first draft that contains mistakes. Read the passage and then answer the question.

(1) I started playing football on a new team this year, our coach gave us a notebook with plays in it. (2) I looked at the pages, but I didn't understand anything. (3) The coach showed us the book and explained the drawings. (4) they were all X's, O's, and arrows. (5)When I looked at them, they just looked like someone had scribbled on the paper!

What is the best way to correct sentence 1?
  1. I started playing football on a new team this year. Our coach gave us a notebook with plays in it.
  2. I started playing football on a new team this year: our coach gave us a notebook with plays in it.
  3. I started playing football. On a new team this year, our coach gave us a notebook with plays in it.
  4. I started playing football on a new team this year. our coach gave us a notebook with plays in it.
Grade 7 Sentence Structure CCSS: CCRA.L.1, CCRA.L.3, L.7.1, L.7.3
The two independent clauses in a compound sentence are connected by...
  1. a transition word
  2. a verb
  3. a conjunction
  4. a common denominator
Grade 7 Sentence Structure CCSS: CCRA.L.1, CCRA.L.3, L.7.1, L.7.1b, L.7.3
Why should you use compound sentences?
  1. to connect ideas
  2. to add detail
  3. to contrast information
  4. all of the above
Grade 12 Commas CCSS: CCRA.L.2, CCRA.L.3, L.11-12.2, L.11-12.3
"All children, except one, grow up." - Peter Pan

In the sentence above, the commas help achieve what purpose?
  1. Add another item to a list
  2. Provide an exception to a claim
  3. Give the reader additional information
  4. Make the sentence more interesting
Grade 11 Grammar CCSS: CCRA.L.3, L.11-12.3
When writing, using a word like SPECTACLES or EYEGLASSES instead of the word GLASSES represents:
  1. regional word choice
  2. American English
  3. British English
  4. using a thesaurus
Grade 11 Capitalization and Punctuation CCSS: CCRA.L.2, CCRA.L.3, L.8.2a, L.11-12.2, L.11-12.3
"I am a sick man . . . I am a spiteful man." - Notes from the Underground

In the sentence above, how is the ellipsis used?
  1. To indicate an omission in the sentence
  2. To show the narrator trailing off in thought
  3. To denote information before the sentence
  4. To connect the two ideas
Grade 2 Capitalization and Punctuation CCSS: CCRA.L.3, L.2.3
Choose the sentence that is written correctly.
  1. My sister jessica is studying to become a doctor.
  2. My sister Jessica is studying to become a doctor.
  3. My sister Jessica is studying to become a Doctor.
Grade 4 Writing CCSS: CCRA.W.5, CCRA.L.3, W.4.5, L.4.3
Mrs. Carpenter wanted to add an imperative sentence to the first paragraph. She decided to add the sentence "Don't throw away anything." Was her decision correct?
  1. Yes. Mrs. Carpenter is commanding you not to throw away things that maybe used.
  2. Yes. Mrs. Carpenter likes to boss people around.
  3. No. Mrs. Carpenter should have used a question mark at the end of the sentence.
  4. No. Mrs. Carpenter should have used a comma instead.
Grade 8 Writing CCSS: CCRA.L.3, L.8.3
Grade 11 Grammar CCSS: CCRA.L.3, L.11-12.3
Spelling a word like ARTIFACT as ARTEFACT represents a:
  1. synonym
  2. antonym
  3. misspelling
  4. variant
Grade 7 Sentence Structure CCSS: CCRA.L.3, L.7.3
Which sentence is not a complete thought?
  1. The largest immigrant groups came from Europe.
  2. Many immigrants passed through Ellis Island in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
  3. Each group brought their culture to America.
  4. Living in ghettos, ethnic communities with other people that spoke their language.
Grade 6 Sentence Structure CCSS: CCRA.L.3, L.6.3, L.6.3a
Which option correctly combines the following two simple sentences to create a compound sentence?

Marisol plays the harp.
She is not very good.
  1. Marisol plays the harp, but she is not very good.
  2. Marisol is not very good at playing the harp.
  3. When she plays the harp, Marisol is not very good.
  4. Although she is not very good, Marisol plays the harp.
Grade 6 Subject-Verb Agreement CCSS: CCRA.L.3, L.6.3, L.6.3a
Which is the BEST way to combine the following sentences?

Chandra bought the puzzle. She wrapped the puzzle.
  1. Chandra bought the puzzle, and wrapped the puzzle.
  2. Chandra bought and wrapped the puzzle.
  3. Chandra wrapped the puzzle after she bought the puzzle.
  4. Wrapping the puzzle, Chandra bought it.
Grade 6 Sentence Structure CCSS: CCRA.L.3, L.6.3, L.6.3a
Which option correctly combines the following two simple sentences to create a compound sentence?

I like cats.
Orange-striped cats are my favorite.
  1. Even though dogs are cute, I like cats and orange-striped cats are my favorite.
  2. I like cats and orange-striped cats are my favorite.
  3. Orange-striped cats are my favorite cats.
  4. I like orange-striped cats.
1 2 3 4 5

Become a Pro subscriber to access Common Core questions

Unlimited premium printables Unlimited online testing Unlimited custom tests

Learn More About Benefits and Options

You need to have at least 5 reputation to vote a question down. Learn How To Earn Badges.