Search Results for plot - All Grades

190 questions match "plot" across multiple grade levels.

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Grade 7 :: Story Elements by Ronica
What is the plot in a story?
  1. the sequence of events
  2. the main character's ideas and feelings
  3. how the main character handles conflict
  4. the character's goals and dreams
Grade 8 :: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by szeiger
Fill in the plot pyramid with details from Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl.
Plot Diagram
  • Opening - Narrator tells readers story is all true
    Rising action - Linda is stuck on Dr. Flint's plantation.
    Climax - Linda runs away
    Falling action - Linda's children and brother are in jail, Mr. Sands breaks his promise
    Conclusion - Linda and her children are free
Grade 7 :: Vocabulary by adouglas
Plot
  1. story line
  2. the main characters
  3. the place things happen
  4. in chronological order
Grade 7 :: Story Elements by sreynolds2
Plot is...
  1. the time and place of actions in a story.
  2. the sequence of events in a story.
  3. the people or animals in a story.
Grade 9 :: Vocabulary by ptemples
plot
  1. hints about the future
  2. the story; what happens in the story, the action
  3. a play
Grade 6 :: Character Study by mwoldum
My Own Wings
by A. Gautam

"Hey, do you want to write something for the school play?" Hiro asked Sayaka, knowing that it was an offer she could not refuse.
"You mean?an actual play?" Sayaka voiced her disbelief and joy. "For the talent show?"
"Yeah, girl!" Hiro cheered. "Thought I'd ask you first, you know. It can be about anything. Make it half an hour long and create at least five characters. When can you get it done?"
"Um, I can have it by the weekend," Sayaka nearly screamed with excitement. "Do you need it sooner?"
"Perfect," Hiro said with a smile. "I knew you were the girl for it!" He walked away from the classroom whistling and already searching for five actors for Sayaka's play. He knew making the talent show a success would help him get another letter of recommendation for his college applications.
As Sayaka gathered her belongings in the backpack, she could not help but feel that this was her moment. She knew her parents would be there to watch the play. This was her chance to say things she was too afraid to tell her father. In a matter of minutes, Sayaka had thought out the plot in her mind. The main character in her play was going to be a high school student who tells her father that she does not want to be a doctor. The girl in the play would convince her father to let her apply for college to study literature. The thought of introducing her father to this idea thrilled and scared Sayaka.What if he does not get it? she asked herself. Then, how will I talk to him?
Sayaka had decided she would give her idea a try and wrote the best play she had ever written. The characters came alive in the script. When Hiro's friends tried out for the play, they all loved the script and wanted in. Before she knew it, Sayaka was sitting between her mother and father among the audience watching her own creation, My Own Wings. As the lights became dim, Sayaka felt her heart beating louder. The curtains were lifted and the play had begun. The half-hour felt like eternity as the auditorium was filled with Sayaka's words.
In her mind, she repeated each line with the characters and gauged the audience's reaction. The person whose response she cared about the most was sitting next to her. This was the moment Sally, the main character, spoke the most important dialogue of the play: "Father, I love and respect you very much. You have always taught me to think on my own. Today, I have come to tell you that I do not want to be a doctor; I want to be a writer!"
As the words were spoken, Sayaka felt her father's warm hands tap her back. "I am proud of you, and I know you want to talk," he whispered into her ears. "I am ready to listen."
When the play ended in a thunderstorm of applause, many teachers, students, and parents congratulated Sayaka on her success. The compliments made her happy, but she had already received the prize she wanted to win. Her father had understood everything.

What happens in the story's resolution?
  1. Everyone who tries out for the play wants to act in it.
  2. The auditorium is filled with the words in Sayaka's play.
  3. Sayaka's father lets her know that he is ready to listen.
  4. The curtain is lifted and My Own Wings begins playing.
Grade 6 :: Reading Strategies by Blegger
Create and label Freytag's pyramid.
Grade 7 :: Sequencing of Events by teacher2XL
The elements of a plot are:
  1. exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution.
  2. setting, rising action, falling action, climax, resolution.
  3. not as important as the characters.
  4. resolution, rising action, exposition, climax.
Grade 6 :: English Language Arts by shelbylyn
What is plot?
  1. the problem in the story
  2. time, place, and duration in a story
  3. is the sequence of events in the story
  4. the central message or idea about life
Grade 7 :: Story Elements by Ronica
What things may help you find the plot in a story?
  1. the character's dialogue
  2. how the character feels at the end of the story
  3. signal words and the order of the details in a story
  4. the author's purpose for writing the story
Grade 8 :: Statistics and Probability Concepts by Robyn_Black
How is a scatter plot that shows NO CORRELATION different from a scatter plot that shows a NEGATIVE CORRELATION?
  • Negative correlation show one set of data values increases as the other set decreases.
    No correlation show no relationship between the data sets.
Grade 6 :: Reading Strategies by beacon902
What is plot?
  1. the problem in the story
  2. time, place, and duration in a story
  3. the development of the central conflict and resolution
  4. the central message or idea about life
Grade 7 :: Story Elements by MrsGee
The climax of a plot is:
  1. the highest point of tension or suspense in the conflict
  2. a part of the setting or place in the story that has the highest elevation
  3. part of when the initial conflict happens in a story
  4. the point of time in the story during which the main character is most happy
Grade 7 :: Reading Strategies by mwoldum

This question is a part of a group with common instructions. View group »

In this passage, the events in the fourth and fifth paragraphs are primarily intended to
  1. provide resolution to the climactic events of the plot.
  2. build up the tension and suspense in the story.
  3. reduce the level of tension and conflict in the story.
  4. set the scene by giving background information.
Grade 6 :: Story Elements by mwoldum

This question is a part of a group with common instructions. View group »

Which event occurs in the rising action?
  1. Eddie, Cathie, and Marie hear a horrible squeal.
  2. Eddie, Cathie, and Marie walk toward the dam.
  3. Eddie, Cathie, and Marie learn about the lost pig.
  4. Eddie, Cathie, and Marie walk home in silence.
Grade 8 :: Reading Strategies by mwoldum
The Man Upstairs
by P.G. Wodehouse

There were three distinct stages in the evolution of Annette Brougham's attitude toward the knocking in the room above. In the beginning, it had been merely a vague discomfort. Absorbed in the composition of her waltz, she had heard it almost subconsciously. The second stage set in when it became a physical pain like red-hot pincers wrenching her mind from her music. Finally, with a thrill of indignation, she knew it for what it was - an insult. The unseen brute disliked her playing and was intimating his views with a boot-heel.
Defiantly, with her foot on the loud pedal, she struck - almost slapped - the keys once more.
"Bang!" from the room above. "Bang! Bang!"
Annette rose. Her face was pink, her chin tilted. Her eyes sparkled with the light of battle. She left the room and started to mount the stairs. No spectator, however just, could have helped feeling a pang of pity for the wretched man who stood unconscious of imminent doom, possibly even triumphant, behind the door at which she was on the point of tapping.
"Come in!" cried the voice, rather a pleasant voice, but what is a pleasant voice if the soul be vile?
Annette went in. The room was a typical Chelsea studio, scantily furnished and lacking a carpet. In the center was an easel, behind which were visible a pair of trousered legs. A cloud of grey smoke was curling up over the top of the easel.
"I beg your pardon," began Annette.
"I don't want any models at present," said the Brute. "Leave your card on the table."
"I am not a model," said Annette, coldly. "I merely came?"
At this the Brute emerged from his fortifications and removing his pipe from his mouth, jerked his chair out into the open.
"I beg your pardon," he said. "Won't you sit down?"
How reckless is Nature in the distribution of her gifts! Not only had this black-hearted knocker on floors a pleasant voice, but, in addition, a pleasing exterior. He was slightly disheveled at the moment, and his hair stood up in a disordered mop, but in spite of these drawbacks, he was quite passably good-looking. Annette admitted this. Though wrathful, she was fair.

Which sentence is from the story's exposition?
  1. No spectator, however just, could have helped feeling a pang of pity for the wretched man who stood unconscious of imminent doom. . . .
  2. Not only had this black-hearted knocker on floors a pleasant voice, but, in addition, a pleasing exterior.
  3. There were three distinct stages in the evolution of Annette Brougham's attitude toward the knocking in the room above.
  4. At this the Brute emerged from his fortifications and removing his pipe from his mouth, jerked his chair out into the open.
Grade 7 :: Reading Strategies by mwoldum

This question is a part of a group with common instructions. View group »

Which of the following happens in the passage's rising action?
  1. A German soldier discovers Ellen and arrests her.
  2. Annemarie and Ellen hold each other tightly.
  3. A German soldier searches the room of two girls.
  4. Annemarie tells Ellen to take her necklace off.
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