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This printable supports Common Core ELA Standard CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.2 and CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.2

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Main Idea (Grade 7)

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Main Idea

1. 
Tired of unwanted e-mail filling up your inbox? You can opt out of most unsolicited e-mail lists by going to the "unsubscribe" button, usually found at the bottom of the message. Some senders make the button difficult to find, so you may have to do some searching. Decrease the number of spam e-mails you receive by making it difficult for spammers to get and use your e-mail address.

1. Never reply to a spam e-mail.
2. Don't use an obvious e-mail address, such as JaneDoe@isp.com. Instead use numbers or other digits, such as Jane4oe6@isp.com.
3. Use one e-mail address for close friends and family and another for everyone else. Free addresses are available from Yahoo! and Hotmail. If an address attracts too much spam, get rid of it and establish a new one.
4. Don't post your e-mail address on a public web page. Spammers use software that harvests text addresses.
5. Don't enter your address on a website before you check its privacy policy.
6. Uncheck any check boxes. These often grant the site or its partners permission to contact you.
7. Don't click on an e-mail's "unsubscribe" link unless you trust the sender. This action tells the sender you're there.
8. Never forward chain letters, petitions or virus warnings. All could be a spammer's trick to collect addresses.
9. Disable your e-mail "preview pane." This stops spam from reporting to its sender that you've received it.
10. Choose an Internet Service Provider (ISP) that filters e-mail. If you get lots of spam, your ISP may not be filtering effectively.
11. Use spam-blocking software. Web browser software often includes free filtering options. You can also purchase special software that will accomplish this task.
12. Report spam. Alert your ISP that spam is slipping through its filters. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) also wants to know about "unsolicited commercial e-mail."
A. 
What is the main idea of this passage?
  1. Most people have ineffective or weak passwords.
  2. The Federal Trade Commission monitors unsolicited mail.
  3. There are a number of simple ways to avoid getting spam on the computer.
  4. Spam comes from companies who want to infect computers or steal personal information.
B. 
What would make the best title for this passage?
  1. A Dozen Simple Ways to Avoid Getting Spam
  2. The Importance of Choosing the Best Internet Service Provider
  3. Creating the Strongest Possible Password to Avoid Spam
  4. Why You Should Never Hit "Unsubscribe" or "Preview Pane"
C. 
Which detail would fit best with the main idea in point #9?
  1. How spam is reported to its sender
  2. The function of "preview pane" on a computer
  3. Why spam has grown so much in recent years
  4. Where to find "preview pane" on a computer
2. 
Crystal stood in front of the classroom and focused on not letting her hands shake too obviously. Having a tall podium helped as she placed her note cards on it, and stopped worrying about dropping them or getting them completely out of order. She wanted to make a good impression on the members of the city council, rather than give them something to shake their heads about after the presentation.

"Ladies and gentlemen I am here to encourage everyone to participate in the neighborhood garage sales next month," said Crystal, hoping her voice sounded stronger to the audience than it did in her head. "In the past, families have had sales in order to clean out closets, make room in attics, and straighten up basements, but this year, we are hoping households will have sales and donate at least a portion of profits to the local children's hospital. The money we raise will allow the staff to purchase new toys and games for the patients." She paused and took a deep breath. "Please consider joining us and making many children's lives a little brighter . . . thank you."

To her surprise, people began clapping; Crystal relaxed for the first time. Everyone might go home talking about her after the meeting, but their smiles reassured her that she did not need to worry about what they might be saying.
A. 
Which detail would best fit in the first paragraph of the passage?
  1. How Crystal was chosen to speak to the city council
  2. Why the children's hospital needed new toys and games
  3. When the people in the neighborhood should plan to hold their sales
  4. What people said about Crystal's speech after the meeting
B. 
What would make the best title for this story?
  1. Speaking to the City Council
  2. Making Children's Lives Brighter
  3. Organizing a Neighborhood Garage Sale
  4. Cleaning out Closets, Attics, and Basements
C. 
How was Crystal's presentation received?
  1. rudely
  2. warmly
  3. quietly
  4. excitedly

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