Notes

This printable supports Common Core ELA Standards ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2, ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3, ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4, and ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.6

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Analyzing a Persuasive Passage (Grade 10)

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Analyzing a Persuasive Passage

Passage 1

Drugs That People Abuse
A drug is a chemical substance that can change how your body and mind work. Drugs of abuse are substances that people use to get high and change how they feel. They may be illegal drugs like pot, cocaine, or heroin. Or they may be legal for adults only, like alcohol and tobacco.

Medicines that treat illness can also become drugs of abuse when people take them to get high—not because they're sick and following their doctor's orders. People can even abuse cough or cold medicines from the store if they ignore the directions and take too much at one time.

People abuse drugs for many reasons:

They want to feel good. Taking a drug can feel really good for a short time. That's why people keep taking them—to have those good feelings again and again. But even though someone may take more and more of a drug, the good feelings don't last. Soon the person is taking the drug just to keep from feeling bad.

They want to stop feeling bad. Some people who feel very worried, afraid, or sad abuse drugs to try to stop feeling so awful. This doesn't really help their problems and can lead to addiction, which can make them feel much worse.

They want to do well in school or at work. Some people who want to get good grades, get a better job, or earn more money might think drugs will give them more energy, keep them awake, or make them think faster. But it usually doesn't work, may put their health at risk, and may lead to addiction.


Passage 2

Quitting marijuana: "I need different people around me."
To stop using marijuana, "Cristina" is making positive changes in her life. She finds support from family and friends who don't use marijuana. (This story is based on the experiences of real people whose names have been changed.)

I've tried to quit smoking weed so many times. I think, "OK, just one more time, and then I'll stop for real." But I never lasted more than a week. I would miss how relaxed and happy it makes me feel. And when I hadn't smoked it for a few days, I'd feel jumpy and upset. And smoking a joint made everything feel better.

There was another reason it was hard to quit. Whenever I hung out with my friends, we'd share a couple of joints. I worried that they'd be mad at me if I said I didn't want to.

I used to have hobbies: cooking, travelling. I had plans for the future. But I stopped caring about these things the more I smoked weed. I'd just sit around, watching TV, eating too much junk food, and letting the world pass me by. I realized that I needed a big change. I need different people around me.

I decided to talk to my Auntie Rosita about quitting marijuana. She freaked out a little at first. But then she helped me find a day clinic where I could get treatment. Auntie Rosita calls all the time now to check in. It helps so much to talk to her. I'm reconnecting with some old friends, too. We lost touch because they don't smoke weed.

I haven't had any marijuana for two weeks now, longer than any other time that I've tried to quit. I've had some trouble sleeping, and I was feeling pretty tense during the day, but it's getting better. I feel like I can think more clearly. I can remember things better. I still get cravings, especially when I smell weed or see someone smoking it. I have to remind myself to stay away from parties where there might be weed.
1. 
The passages discuss drug abuse. In the context of the passages, which choice best represents the meaning of ABUSE?
  1. Use something for a negative purpose
  2. Treat someone with cruelty
  3. Use something improperly
  4. Use something habitually and excessively
2. 
Which sentence from the passage best supports the definition of abuse?
  1. Medicines that treat illness can also become drugs of abuse when people take them to get high—not because they're sick and following their doctor's orders.
  2. Or they may be legal for adults only, like alcohol and tobacco.
  3. That's why people keep taking them—to have those good feelings again and again.
  4. Some people who feel very worried, afraid, or sad abuse drugs to try to stop feeling so awful.
3. 
The author of Passage 1 most likely wrote the passage to...
  1. Educate teens about drug abuse
  2. Discourage teens from abusing drugs
  3. Provide solutions for teens currently abusing drugs
  4. Both a and b
4. 
Why does the author likely include the reasons people choose to abuse drugs?






5. 
How could the author of the passage make the argument against drug abuse even stronger?
  1. Introduce the names and descriptions of abused drugs
  2. Provide specific examples of problems drug abusers face
  3. Use fear tactics to scare teens away from drugs
  4. Keep repeating how bad drugs are for teens
6. 
How does Passage 2 most differ from Passage 1?






7. 
Which passage would be most effective for discouraging drug abuse among teens? Explain.






8. 
Which choice shows why Passage 2 cannot reach maximum effectiveness?
  1. The lack of the severity of the consequences
  2. The changed names
  3. A lack of credibility
  4. A limited viewpoint
9. 
Which point about why people abuse drugs from Passage 1 does Passage 2 support?
  1. They want to feel good.
  2. They want to stop feeling bad.
  3. They want to do well in school.
  4. They want to have more energy.
10. 
What point does Passage 2 bring up that Passage 1 does not include?
  1. The physical problems that result from trying to quit
  2. The negative effects that come from abusing drugs
  3. The power of peer pressure in encouraging drug abuse
  4. The difficulty in overcoming drug abuse

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