Notes

This printable supports Common Core ELA Standards ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.2, ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.4, and ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.6

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Analyzing a Persuasive Speech (Grades 11-12)

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Analyzing a Persuasive Speech

In your hands, my fellow citizens, more than in mine, will rest the final success or failure of our course. Since this country was founded, each generation of Americans has been summoned to give testimony to its national loyalty. The graves of young Americans who answered the call to service surround the globe.

Now the trumpet summons us again - not as a call to bear arms, though arms we need; not as a call to battle, though embattled we are - but a call to bear the burden of a long twilight struggle, year in and year out, "rejoicing in hope, patient in tribulation" - a struggle against the common enemies of man: tyranny, poverty, disease, and war itself.

Can we forge against these enemies a grand and global alliance, North and South, East and West, that can assure a more fruitful life for all mankind? Will you join in that historic effort?

In the long history of the world, only a few generations have been granted the role of defending freedom in its hour of maximum danger. I do not shank from this responsibility - I welcome it. I do not believe that any of us would exchange places with any other people or any other generation. The energy, the faith, the devotion which we bring to this endeavor will light our country and all who serve it -- and the glow from that fire can truly light the world.

And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you -- ask what you can do for your country.

My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.

Finally, whether you are citizens of America or citizens of the world, ask of us the same high standards of strength and sacrifice which we ask of you. With a good conscience our only sure reward, with history the final judge of our deeds, let us go forth to lead the land we love, asking His blessing and His help, but knowing that here on earth God's work must truly be our own.
1. 
What is the theme of this speech?
  1. The right to bear arms
  2. Being a good citizen
  3. Defending freedom
  4. Being an American
2. 
How does JFK craft his approach to make it appeal to all citizens?
  1. He uses the bandwagon technique.
  2. He makes them feel bad for not pitching in.
  3. He asks nicely.
  4. He uses examples from around the United States.
3. 
The speech has been considered a call to America's youth.
How does this speech inspire young people?



4. 
Which phrase represents a metaphor to show the contagiousness of joining together to take action?
  1. "Now the trumpet summons us again — not as a call to bear arms, though arms we need; not as a call to battle, though embattled we are — but a call to bear the burden of a long twilight struggle..."
  2. "Can we forge against these enemies a grand and global alliance, North and South, East and West, that can assure a more fruitful life for all mankind?"
  3. "The energy, the faith, the devotion which we bring to this endeavour will light our country and all who serve it — and the glow from that fire can truly light the world."
  4. "My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man."
5. 
JFK does not address the American people. Who else does he address?



6. 
Which mode of persuasion does JFK use to make his point?
  1. Ethos
  2. Pathos
  3. Logos
  4. None of the above
7. 
How does JFK use pathos in his speech?



8. 
Since this his inauguration speech, JFK uses it as an opportunity to puff up himself and share all of his qualifications.
  1. True
  2. False
9. 
In the infamous line, "And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you -- ask what you can do for your country," what is Kennedy asking people to do?



10. 
Which war largely caused the pessimistic tone JFK was trying to overcome?
  1. World War II
  2. The Korean War
  3. The Cold War
  4. The Vietnam War

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