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This printable supports Common Core ELA Standards ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3 and ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3

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Compare and Contrast Mixed Genre (Grade 9)

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Compare and Contrast Mixed Genre

Passages to India
by A. Gautam

Tabitha Turner had been to India before, but she had no memory of the language. She often felt that India was in her blood. Tabitha's grandfather, James Turner I, was an officer in the East India Company, and her father, James Turner II, was born in Surat, India. Even her mother, Beatrice, was born to a British family living in Bengal. James Turner II had returned to India to establish a soft drink company and had brought his family to live there for a few years. The company had failed miserably as India had changed tremendously after the Independence.

"Why don't I remember a single word, Mother?" Tabitha often asked her mother for an easy explanation for complicated things like that. She knew that she had spent her infant years listening to Hindi lullabies from her Indian nanny. And she needed the language because she was returning to India as a volunteer for the Peace Corps.

"Maybe you will remember when you get there," Beatrice, now a middle-aged woman, replied. She had forgotten many Hindi words herself. In her memory, India had transformed. It was no longer the exotic land she had read and heard about. She had known the real India. Beatrice held her young daughter's hands and slowly spoke, "You just have to remember what you see is more real than what you have been told."

Passage 2
The Indus Valley civilization, one of the world's oldest, flourished during the 3rd and 2nd millennia B.C. and extended into northwestern India. Aryan tribes from the northwest infiltrated the Indian subcontinent about 1500 B.C.; their merger with the earlier Dravidian inhabitants created the classical Indian culture. The Maurya Empire of the 4th and 3rd centuries B.C. - which reached its zenith under ASHOKA - united much of South Asia. The Golden Age ushered in by the Gupta dynasty (4th to 6th centuries A.D.) saw a flowering of Indian science, art, and culture. Islam spread across the subcontinent over a period of 700 years. In the 10th and 11th centuries, Turks and Afghans invaded India and established the Delhi Sultanate. In the early 16th century, the Emperor BABUR established the Mughal Dynasty which ruled India for more than three centuries. European explorers began establishing footholds in India during the 16th century. By the 19th century, Great Britain had become the dominant political power on the subcontinent. The British Indian Army played a vital role in both World Wars. Years of nonviolent resistance to British rule, led by Mohandas GANDHI and Jawaharlal NEHRU, eventually resulted in Indian independence, which was granted in 1947. Large-scale communal violence took place before and after the subcontinent partition into two separate states - India and Pakistan. The neighboring nations have fought three wars since independence, the last of which was in 1971 and resulted in East Pakistan becoming the separate nation of Bangladesh. India's nuclear weapons tests in 1998 emboldened Pakistan to conduct its own tests that same year. In November 2008, terrorists originating from Pakistan conducted a series of coordinated attacks in Mumbai, India's financial capital. Despite pressing problems such as significant overpopulation, environmental degradation, extensive poverty, and widespread corruption, economic growth following the launch of economic reforms in 1991 and a massive youthful population are driving India's emergence as a regional and global power.
1. 
In this story, what does the author encourage the British to overcome?
  1. the reluctance to learn Indian music
  2. a desire to speak the Indian language
  3. their confusions about the history of India
  4. their pre-established ideas about India
2. 
According to the passage, what language do they speak in India?
  1. Indian
  2. English
  3. Hindi
  4. French
3. 
What does her mother mean when she says that what she'll see in India is more real than what she has been told?



4. 
Based on the passage, you can infer that India gained its independence from...
  1. The Americans
  2. The French
  3. The British
  4. A negative ruler
5. 
How did Tabitha's childhood memories of India differ from her current perception of the country?



6. 
Which sentence from passage 2 shows India as the exotic nation Tabitha remembers in passage 1?
  1. European explorers began establishing footholds in India during the 16th century.
  2. The Indus Valley civilization, one of the world's oldest, flourished during the 3rd and 2nd millennia B.C. and extended into northwestern India.
  3. Years of nonviolent resistance to British rule, led by Mohandas GANDHI and Jawaharlal NEHRU, eventually resulted in Indian independence, which was granted in 1947.
  4. Aryan tribes from the northwest infiltrated the Indian subcontinent about 1500 B.C.; their merger with the earlier Dravidian inhabitants created the classical Indian culture.
7. 
How does Passage 2's discussion of India's independence from the British differ from the fight and view of India alluded to in Passage 1?



8. 
Passage 1 says that India changed after its independence. Which line from Passage 2 most supports that?
  1. The neighboring nations have fought three wars since independence, the last of which was in 1971 and resulted in East Pakistan becoming the separate nation of Bangladesh.
  2. Years of nonviolent resistance to British rule, led by Mohandas GANDHI and Jawaharlal NEHRU, eventually resulted in Indian independence, which was granted in 1947.
  3. Despite pressing problems such as significant overpopulation, environmental degradation, extensive poverty, and widespread corruption, economic growth following the launch of economic reforms in 1991 and a massive youthful population are driving India's emergence as a regional and global power.
  4. The British Indian Army played a vital role in both World Wars.
9. 
Which sentence from Passage 2 best supports the final sentence from Passage 2, "You just have to remember what you see is more real than what you have been told"?
  1. The Golden Age ushered in by the Gupta dynasty (4th to 6th centuries A.D.) saw a flowering of Indian science, art, and culture.
  2. Despite pressing problems such as significant overpopulation, environmental degradation, extensive poverty, and widespread corruption, economic growth following the launch of economic reforms in 1991 and a massive youthful population are driving India's emergence as a regional and global power.
  3. ears of nonviolent resistance to British rule, led by Mohandas GANDHI and Jawaharlal NEHRU, eventually resulted in Indian independence, which was granted in 1947.
  4. The neighboring nations have fought three wars since independence, the last of which was in 1971 and resulted in East Pakistan becoming the separate nation of Bangladesh.
10. 
How do the two passages differ the most?



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