Golf (Grade 5)

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Golf

Golf is a game played over an extensive piece of ground. It's divided into certain random divisions called holes. A golf course is usually smooth and wavy with the holes laid out to offer the greatest possible variety of play. The goal is to make it challenging while still accessible to all levels of players.

The ordinary course consists of either nine or eighteen holes from 100 to 500 yards apart. An ideal course is about 6000 yards long. The holes which mark the end of a playing section consist of tin cans 4 inches in diameter sunk into and flush with the level of the surrounding turf, which is called "the putting green."

The game is played with a ball weighing about 1 3/4 ounces and with a set of "clubs" of various odd shapes and for making shots under various conditions. Usually a boy accompanies each player to carry his clubs. Such boys are called "caddies." The clubs are peculiarly named and it is optional with each player to have as many clubs as he desires. Some of the more common ones are called "driver," "brassie," "cleek," "iron," "mashie," "niblick," "putter," and "lofting iron."

The game, which may be played by either two or four players, consists in trying to drive the ball over the entire course from hole to hole in the fewest possible number of strokes. At the start a player takes his position on what is called the "teeing ground" and drives the ball in the direction of the first hole, the position of which is shown in the distance by a flag or tin sign with a number.

Before driving the player places the ball on a tiny mound of earth or sand which is called a "tee." The players drive in order and then continue making shots toward the hole until finally they have all "holed out" by "putting" their balls into the hole, and the lowest score wins the hole.

Golf is a game in which form is more essential than physical strength and which is adapted for elderly people as well as the young.

A set of golf clubs for most purposes will consist of four to six clubs. The caddy bag to carry the clubs is made of canvas or leather. Almost any loose-fitting outdoor outfit is suitable for playing golf and the tendency in recent years is to wear long trousers in preference to what are known as "golf trousers."

A golf course—sometimes called a "links," from a Scotch word meaning a flat stretch of ground near the seashore—should be kept in good condition in order to enjoy the game properly. The leading golf clubs maintain a large force of men who are constantly cutting the grass, repairing damages to the turf, and rolling the greens. For this reason it is a game only adapted to club control unless one is very wealthy and can afford to maintain private links.
1. 
According to the passage, how many clubs does the average golf player use?
  1. 4
  2. 6
  3. 8
  4. It all depends on the golfer
2. 
According to the passage, what is the purpose of the game of golf?
  1. To get the ball in the hole as quickly as possible
  2. To get the ball in the hole with the fewest number of strokes
  3. To get the ball in all the holes with the fewest strokes
  4. To get the ball across the course with the fewest strokes avoiding all the holes
3. 
Golfers must have incredible strength.
  1. True
  2. False
4. 
Why does the author say the game is well-suited for older people?
  1. Because the way you hit the ball is more important than your strength
  2. Because it is not very exciting, making it perfect for older people
  3. Because it takes up a lot of time that people who work don't have
  4. Because older people have more money so they can afford the game
5. 
Based on the passage, you can infer that golf trousers are...
  1. longer pants
  2. shorter pants
  3. pants that fit tightly
  4. pant preferred by golfers
6. 
Which word describes the upkeep of a golf course?
  1. expensive
  2. tedious
  3. cheap
  4. both a and b
7. 
What is the role of a caddy?
  1. Keeping the score
  2. Hitting the ball
  3. Carrying the clubs
  4. Maintaining the links
8. 
According to the passage, golfers choose which clubs to carry, but you can infer that it is to a golfer's advantage to have more clubs because...
  1. it makes it easier to hit a wider variety of shots.
  2. it provides alternatives in case clubs break.
  3. it gives the caddy more work to do to earn his pay.
  4. it helps the golfer reach the hole in fewer strokes.
9. 
Step 1: Read the Green
Before you can even think about hitting the ball, you have to know which way it’s going to go. It’s usually easiest to squat down a fair distance behind your golf ball (around 5-10 feet) and look at the green between the ball and the hole.

Look for different shades in the grass. The shininess and grain of the grass can tell you how the ball is going to roll. Also look for bumps, ball marks, or debris that you may need to fix in order to have a smooth path to the hole. Then go to the other side of the hole, looking towards your ball, and do the same thing.

Step 2: Visualize the Putt
Close your eyes and picture yourself hitting the putt and it rolling into the bottom of the cup. This will allow you to feel comfortable over the ball and get a good gauge of how the putt should look as it rolls along your path to the hole.

Step 3: Take Practice Swings
Stand with your putter beside the ball and take smooth strokes with the power you estimate it will take to get the ball to the hole along the correct line. Take about two to four practice swings and then take a deep breath.

Step 4: Address the Ball
Put your putter behind the ball, feet shoulder width apart and relaxed. Take a deep breath then proceed to step 5.

Step 5: Hit the Putt
Take a deep breath, take a smooth stroke and hit your putt. Trust your line and believe in yourself.

Step 6: Watch the Putt Fall
After you hit your putt, watch it roll towards the hole and fall into the bottom of the hole. Fist pumps are encouraged after it goes in.

How is this passage different from the first passage?



10. 
How to Putt a Golf Ball

Step 1: Read the Green
Before you can even think about hitting the ball, you have to know which way it’s going to go. It’s usually easiest to squat down a fair distance behind your golf ball (around 5-10 feet) and look at the green between the ball and the hole.

Look for different shades in the grass. The shininess and grain of the grass can tell you how the ball is going to roll. Also look for bumps, ball marks, or debris that you may need to fix in order to have a smooth path to the hole. Then go to the other side of the hole, looking towards your ball, and do the same thing.

Step 2: Visualize the Putt
Close your eyes and picture yourself hitting the putt and it rolling into the bottom of the cup. This will allow you to feel comfortable over the ball and get a good gauge of how the putt should look as it rolls along your path to the hole.

Step 3: Take Practice Swings
Stand with your putter beside the ball and take smooth strokes with the power you estimate it will take to get the ball to the hole along the correct line. Take about two to four practice swings and then take a deep breath.

Step 4: Address the Ball
Put your putter behind the ball, feet shoulder width apart and relaxed. Take a deep breath then proceed to step 5.

Step 5: Hit the Putt
Take a deep breath, take a smooth stroke and hit your putt. Trust your line and believe in yourself.

Step 6: Watch the Putt Fall
After you hit your putt, watch it roll towards the hole and fall into the bottom of the hole. Fist pumps are encouraged after it goes in.

What type of relationship is shown between the two passages?
  1. cause/effect
  2. compare/contrast
  3. whole/part
  4. sport/athlete

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