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Easter Informational Passage (Grade 5)

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Easter Informational Passage

April brings many other good things beside the showers typical of the month; summer now begins to declare itself, and flowers, fruits, and fresh vegetables are in season. Easter usually comes in April, and brings not only a religious festival but a gala day as well, for Easter Monday is holiday time the world over. To keep it hospitably, let us have an EASTER LUNCHEON

For this, no flowers are so appropriate as jonquils, for they are the color of spring sunshine, and have a suggestion of gaiety all their own. They do not lend themselves to any arrangement other than the massing of them in a bowl, but they do blend well with violets; and if your luncheon is very elaborate, the two may be used, the jonquils in the center and the violets in a wreath around the bowl, or in smaller bowls about the table. A mahogany table is at its best with yellow flowers, each setting off the other; but whatever the table, lay it with doilies; if you have a yellow and white centrepiece, use it, but if not, choose a white one. Candles are not to be used in summer weather, unless, as one sometimes sees them by way of decoration, they are unlighted.

In addition to your little dishes of radishes, almonds, candied ginger, and other relishes on the table, have some filled with Easter eggs in candy. Each guest may have a tiny, downy chicken at her plate, such as fill the shops at this season, or if you prefer, a box in the shape of an egg, filled with bonbons, or rather candy eggs. These boxes come in all prices, ranging from a few cents for those of plain cardboard to the expensive ones in satin which are imported and cost an alarming sum; one will have no trouble in finding something pretty within her means.

The ice cream for an Easter luncheon may be very attractive; it comes in various egg forms from the caterer, but the prettiest is that which is in small eggs of ice and cream, in different sizes, served in a nest of spun sugar of a straw color. There is also a large form in which a hen sits on a larger nest of the same sort with little chickens peeping from under her wings, but this is rather too elaborate for a luncheon. If all caterers' forms are out of reach, the best substitute is made by serving rounded spoonfuls of a very yellow cream as nearly like eggs as possible. The menu for the luncheon should consist principally of chicken and eggs in different styles.

MENU

Clams on the Half-Shell.

Cream of Chicken Soup.

Green Peppers Filled with Creamed Salmon.

Patties of Sweetbreads and Mushrooms.

Chicken in Rice Border. New Potatoes.

Lemon and Peppermint Ice.

Egg Salad. Cheese Straws.

Ice Cream in Egg Forms. Cake.

Coffee. Bonbons.

The peppers are prepared by cutting off the small end and filling them with creamed salmon, heating them in the oven before serving. The patties are to be purchased at the bakery and filled with a mixture of sweetbreads and canned mushrooms. The chicken in rice is a delicious dish, and one easily prepared, but seldom seen. The white meat of two or if necessary three chickens is stewed until tender, then cut into pieces about four inches by two, and put in the center of a border of boiled rice which has been turned out on a round platter; a sauce made of the strained chicken stock, thickened and with cream added until it is white in color, is then poured over the whole. If sherry is used it should be added the last thing.

The sherbet is odd; make a lemon ice and divide it; color one half light green and flavor with essence of peppermint; serve the two ices together in glass cups, one layer of each.

The salad is made by cutting a head of lettuce into strips with the scissors, until it looks like grass, and putting this in a sort of nest shape on the plate with the yolks of hard-boiled eggs in a group in the center and mayonnaise in a stiff spoonful on top. The cake served with the cream should be what is called sunshine cake, an angels' food to which the yolks of the eggs has been added.

Another Easter luncheon may be arranged in green and white, which is even more beautiful and stately than this in yellow. For this, have a centrepiece of Easter lilies in a tall slender glass vase, or have three such vases down the table, if it is an oblong one, or several grouped around one larger one in the middle if it is round. Have guest cards painted with Easter lilies, and use only white and green decorations of bonbons on the table,—ribbon candies are pretty, or candy baskets in green filled with white candies. If you use candles on the table, have the shades represent lilies, inverted. The little cakes may be iced in green, and the colors carried out in the ice cream, which may be purchased in beautiful forms of lilies, the flower being of lemon ice and the leaves of pistachio cream. Or, if the cream must be home-made, you may have it of the pistachio and serve it in a bed of whipped cream in rounded spoonfuls. Or, by way of still another method, have a plain white cream and serve it with a spray of maiden-hair fern on each plate.
1. 
The author provides Easter luncheon ideas for someone with any budget.
  1. True
  2. False
2. 
When should the luncheon be held?
  1. The Saturday before Easter
  2. Easter Sunday
  3. Easter Monday
  4. The Sunday after Easter
3. 
What color are the JONQUILS referenced in the passage?
  1. Purple
  2. Green
  3. White
  4. Yellow
4. 
The author suggests giving a tiny downy chicken at each place as an example of a...
  1. party favor
  2. napkin
  3. live animal
  4. name plate
5. 
Which is NOT something the author suggests using to get the green color in a green and white luncheon?
  1. lettuce
  2. green icing
  3. pistachio ice cream
  4. green candy
6. 
Why shouldn't an Easter luncheon include lighted candles?



7. 
What does the author suggest creating with lettuce and hard-boiled eggs?
  1. a rabbit
  2. a chick
  3. a nest
  4. a flower
8. 
Draw a picture of either the yellow or green and white theme mentioned in the passage. Label the picture with items from the passage.



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