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Number of Stars (Grade 3)

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Number of Stars

When you look up into the sky, sometimes you can see stars. The number of stars you can see depends on the number of clouds in the sky. It also depends on the amount of light pollution. It even depends on the strength of your eyes. In most places, on a clear evening, you can see thousands of stars. Some of the stars sit alone in the sky. Others are part of constellations. Whatever you see, it is only a small sampling of the stars that exist in the universe.

How many stars are in the universe?

Scientists don't have an exact answer. The universe is made up of galaxies. Scientists guess there are over 100 billion galaxies in the universe. Some galaxies are small. Some galaxies are large. The number of stars in each galaxy varies, but it's safe to say that each galaxy has at least one star. That means there are over 100 billion stars in the universe.

In fact, there are over 300 billion stars in the universe. How do scientists know? Because the galaxy we live in, called the Milky Way, has over 300 billion stars alone. When you look up in the sky and see a few thousand stars, you're actually only looking at a small number of the over 300 billion stars in the galaxy and trillions, zillions, or possibly even gazillions of stars in the entire universe.
1. 
How many stars are in the sky?
  1. thousands
  2. millions
  3. billions
  4. zillions
2. 
Which sentence from the passage best explains why scientists don't know exactly how many stars are in the sky?
  1. The universe is made up of galaxies and scientists guess there are over 100 billion galaxies in the universe.
  2. Some galaxies are small and some galaxies are large, so the number of stars in each galaxy varies, but it's safe to say that each galaxy has at least one star, so there are over 100 billion stars in the universe.
  3. Scientists don't have an exact answer.
  4. The number of stars you can see depends on the number of clouds in the sky, the amount of light pollution, and the strength of your eyes.
3. 
Where do scientists know there are over 300 billion stars?
  1. The universe
  2. The Milky Way
  3. The entire sky
  4. The sky we can see
4. 
From the passage, you can infer that a galaxy with only one star...
  1. is large
  2. is small
  3. is the Milky Way
  4. is not in existence
5. 
At night, you can see all of the stars in the Milky Way.
  1. True
  2. False
6. 
Which word is most likely a synonym of the word sampling as it is used in the passage?
  1. whole
  2. all
  3. test
  4. part

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