Notes

This worksheet is aligned with CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.1, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.2, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.3, and CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.4 PARCC Practice

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What's in a Name? (Grade 4)

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Name: Date:

What's in a Name?

PETER RABBIT! Peter Rabbit! I don't see what Mother Nature ever gave me such a common sounding name as that for. People laugh at me, but if I had a fine sounding name they wouldn't laugh. Some folks say that a name doesn't amount to anything, but it does. If I should do some wonderful thing, nobody would think anything of it. No, Sir, nobody would think anything of it at all just because—why just because it was done by Peter Rabbit."

Peter was talking out loud, but he was talking to himself. He sat in the dear Old Briar-patch with an ugly scowl on his usually happy face. The sun was shining, the Merry Little Breezes of Old Mother West Wind were dancing over the Green Meadows, the birds were singing, and happiness, the glad, joyous happiness of springtime, was everywhere but in Peter Rabbit's heart. There there seemed to be no room for anything but discontent. And such foolish discontent—discontent with his name! And yet, do you know, there are lots of people just as foolish as Peter Rabbit.

"Well, what are you going to do about it?"

The voice made Peter Rabbit jump and turn around hastily. There was Jimmy Skunk poking his head in at the opening of one of Peter's private little paths. He was grinning, and Peter knew by that grin that Jimmy had heard what he had said. Peter didn't know what to say. He hung his head in a very shame-faced way.

"You've got something to learn," said Jimmy Skunk.

"What is it?" asked Peter.

"It's just this," replied Jimmy.

"There's nothing in a name except
Just what we choose to make it.
It lies with us and no one else
How other folks shall take it.
It's what we do and what we say
And how we live each passing day
That makes it big or makes it small
Or even worse than none at all.
A name just stands for what we are;
It's what we choose to make it.
And that's the way and only way
That other folks will take it."

Peter Rabbit made a face at Jimmy Skunk. "I don't like being preached to."

"I'm not preaching; I'm just telling you what you ought to know without being told," replied Jimmy Skunk. "If you don't like your name, why don't you change it?"

"What's that?" cried Peter sharply.

"If you don't like your name, why don't you change it?" repeated Jimmy.

Peter sat up and the disagreeable frown had left his face. "I—I—hadn't thought of that," he said slowly. "Do you suppose I could, Jimmy Skunk?"

"Easiest thing in the world," replied Jimmy Skunk. "Just decide what name you like and then ask all your friends to call you by it."

"I believe I will!" cried Peter Rabbit.

"Well, let me know what it is when you have decided," said Jimmy, as he started for home. And all the way up the Crooked Little Path, Jimmy chuckled to himself as he thought of foolish Peter Rabbit trying to change his name.
1. 
What is the meaning of the word preached as it is used in Paragraph 9?
  1. yelled at
  2. taught a lesson
  3. told a joke
  4. started an argument
2. 
Which detail from the story helps the reader understand the meaning of the word preached?
  1. I'm not preaching; I'm just telling you what you ought to know without being told.
  2. If you don't like your name, why don't you change it?
  3. Peter sat up and the disagreeable frown had left his face.
  4. And all the way up the Crooked Little Path, Jimmy chuckled to himself as he thought of foolish Peter Rabbit trying to change his name.
3. 
In the text, what can be learned about Peter Rabbit from his statement, "I don't see what Mother Nature ever gave me such a common sounding name as that for"?
  1. Peter Rabbit is usually in a bad mood.
  2. Peter Rabbit is angry with his mother.
  3. Peter Rabbit doesn't want to be bothered.
  4. Peter Rabbit doesn't like his name.
4. 
Which detail supports the answer to Part A?
  1. People laugh at me, but if I had a fine sounding name they wouldn't laugh.
  2. If I should do some wonderful thing, nobody would think anything of it.
  3. Some folks say that a name doesn't amount to anything, but it does.
  4. No, Sir, nobody would think anything of it at all just because—why just because it was done by Peter Rabbit.
5. 
Which sentence summarizes the speaker's thoughts in the poem in the text?
  1. Your name is everything.
  2. Your name is what you make it.
  3. Your name carries a lot of weight.
  4. Your name can make or break you.
6. 
Which lines from the poem best demonstrate the answer to Part A?
  1. It lies with us and no one else/How other folks shall take it.
  2. It's what we do and what we say/And how we live each passing day
  3. That makes it big or makes it small/Or even worse than none at all.
  4. And that's the way and only way/That other folks will take it.

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