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Solstices and Equinoxes (Grade 6)

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Solstices and Equinoxes

1. 
When the sun reaches its greatest difference north or south of the equator that day is called a equinox.
  1. True
  2. False
 
2. 
There will be about 12 hours of daylight on the day of an equinox.
  1. True
  2. False
3. 
The term equinox means
  1. equal day
  2. equal night
  3. equal year
  4. leap year
 
4. 
During the December solstice, the
  1. Southern Hemisphere has winter.
  2. Western Hemisphere has summer.
  3. Southern Hemisphere has summer.
  4. Northern Hemisphere has summer.
5. 
On which day does the Northern Hemisphere receive the most hours of sunlight?
  1. autumnal equinox
  2. winter solstice
  3. vernal equinox
  4. summer solstice
 
6. 
The equinox in spring, on about March 20 in the northern hemisphere and September 22 in the southern hemisphere.
  1. Autumnal
  2. Vernal
  3. Summer
  4. Winter
7. 
The solstice that occurs on June 21 or 22 in the Northern Hemisphere and on December 21 or 22 in the Southern Hemisphere.
  1. Autumnal
  2. Vernal
  3. Summer
  4. Winter
 
8. 
The solstice that occurs on December 21 or 22 in the Northern Hemisphere and on June 21 or 22 in the Southern Hemisphere.
  1. Autumnal
  2. Vernal
  3. Summer
  4. Winter
9. 
The equinox that occurs on September 22 or 23 in the Northern Hemisphere and on March 21 or 22 in the Southern Hemisphere.
  1. Vernal
  2. Summer
  3. Winter
  4. Autumnal
 
10. 
What day is it when the sun is at its lowest elevation in the sky all year and we experience the shortest day of the year?
  1. summer solstice
  2. winter solstice
  3. summer equinox
  4. winter equinox
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