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Poem Analysis: The Wind (Grade 5)

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Poem Analysis: The Wind

The Wind
by Robert Louis Stevenson

I saw you toss the kites on high
And blow the birds about the sky;
And all around I heard you pass,
Like ladies’ skirts across the grass—
       O wind, a-blowing all day long,
       O wind, that sings so loud a song!

I saw the different things you did,
But always you yourself you hid.
I felt you push, I heard you call,
I could not see yourself at all—
       O wind, a-blowing all day long,
       O wind, that sings so loud a song!

O you that are so strong and cold,
O blower, are you young or old?
Are you a beast of field and tree,
Or just a stronger child than me?
       O wind, a-blowing all day long,
       O wind, that sings so loud a song!
1. 
In the poem "The Wind," what is the speaker's problem?
  1. He cannot see the wind.
  2. He cannot feel the wind.
  3. The wind is making a lot of noise.
  4. The wind has blown his hat away.
2. 
In the poem "The Wind," the speaker compares the sound of the wind to
  1. a bird's call.
  2. the ocean's waves
  3. ladies' skirts on the grass.
  4. a broom sweeping the floor.
3. 
In the poem "The Wind," the poet uses personification to describe the wind. Which action of the wind is an example of personification?
  1. singing a song
  2. hiding from all
  3. tossing the kites
  4. blowing the birds
4. 
In the poem "The Wind," what does the author do at the end of each stanza?
  1. includes an onomatopoeia
  2. asks the wind a question
  3. gives the wind a new name
  4. repeats the same two lines
5. 
In the poem "The Wind," what type of wind is the feeling of the poem most like?
  1. a cold wind
  2. a rough wind
  3. a calm wind
  4. a fast wind

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