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Eleventh Grade (Grade 11) Sequences and Series Questions

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Grade 11 Sequences and Series CCSS: HSA-SSE.B.4
Find the sum of the finite geometric series.
[math]1+4+16+64 +...+4^9[/math]
  1. [math]516[/math]
  2. [math]2","073.3[/math]
  3. [math]25","347[/math]
  4. [math]349","525[/math]
  5. None of these are correct
Grade 11 Sequences and Series CCSS: HSF-IF.A.3
Find the next three terms in this sequence: 5120, 1280, 320, 80...
  1. -160, -400, -640
  2. 20, 5, 1.25
  3. 40, 20, 10
  4. 76, 72, 68
Grade 11 Sequences and Series CCSS: HSF-IF.A.3
If [math]a_1=100[/math] and [math]r=1/2[/math], find the 5th term of this geometric sequence.
  1. [math]1[/math]
  2. [math]1600[/math]
  3. [math]6 1/4[/math]
  4. [math]10,000[/math]
  5. none of these are correct
Grade 11 Sequences and Series CCSS: HSF-IF.A.3
In an arithmetic sequence, if the 4th term is 3 and the 22nd term is 15, then what is the 1st term?
  1. [math]2/3[/math]
  2. [math]1[/math]
  3. [math]-3[/math]
  4. [math]-4/3[/math]
  5. none of these are correct
Grade 11 Sequences and Series CCSS: HSA-SSE.B.4
What is the approximate sum of the first 16 numbers in the series [math]1/9+1/27+1/81 +... ?[/math]
  1. [math]0.000167[/math]
  2. [math]5.4 xx10^-16[/math]
  3. [math]1.67[/math]
  4. [math]0.167[/math]
Grade 11 Sequences and Series CCSS: HSA-SSE.B.4
What is the sum of the first 12 numbers in the series [math]8+24+72+216+648 +... ?[/math]
  1. [math]2"," 125"," 760[/math]
  2. [math]6.87 xx10^10[/math]
  3. [math]531","441[/math]
  4. [math]-2"," 125"," 760[/math]
Grade 11 Sequences and Series CCSS: HSA-SSE.B.4
What is the sum of the first 7 numbers in the series [math]5+25+125+625 + ... ?[/math]
  1. [math]19","531[/math]
  2. [math]9.77 xx10^5[/math]
  3. [math]97","655[/math]
  4. [math]78","125[/math]
Grade 11 Sequences and Series CCSS: HSA-SSE.B.4
What is the sum of the first 6 numbers in the series [math]512+2048+8192+... ?[/math]
  1. [math]1.8 xx 10^16[/math]
  2. [math]698","880[/math]
  3. [math]2","096","640[/math]
  4. [math]32","256[/math]
Grade 11 Sequences and Series CCSS: HSF-IF.A.3, HSF-LE.A.2
What is [math]t_n[/math] for the sequence 14/3, 16/3, 6, 20/3, 22/3, ...?
  1. [math]t_n = 2/3n+ 11/3[/math]
  2. [math]t_n= 2/3n + 4[/math]
  3. [math]t_n = 2/3n+ 12/3[/math]
  4. [math]t_n= 2/3n + 6[/math]
Grade 11 Sequences and Series
Find the 12th term of this sequence. [math]a_n=(-1)^(n+1) * e^(n^2)[/math]
  1. -144
  2. 144
  3. [math]-e^144[/math]
  4. [math]e^144[/math]
Grade 11 Sequences and Series CCSS: HSA-SSE.B.4

This question is a part of a group with common instructions. View group »

Are there any restrictions one should have added at the beginning of this derivation? Choose all that apply.
  1. No, this correct as is.
  2. Yes, this derivation is only valid for [math]a>0[/math].
  3. Yes, the formula found is only true if [math]|r|<1[/math].
  4. Yes, it must be stated that [math]r!=1[/math].
Grade 11 Sequences and Series CCSS: HSA-SSE.B.4

This question is a part of a group with common instructions. View group »

Which of the following best explains how one arrives at the equation in step 5?
  1. By stating the definition of a finite geometric sequence.
  2. Subtract [math](1-r)[/math] from both sides of the equation in step 4, and then factor out common factors on the left hand side of the resulting equation.
  3. Factor [math](1-r)[/math] from both sides of the equation in step 4.
  4. Divide both sides of the equation in step 4 by [math](1-r)[/math].
Grade 11 Sequences and Series CCSS: HSA-SSE.B.4

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How does one go from step 3 to step 4?
  1. Use polynomial long division.
  2. Apply the fundamental theorem of algebra.
  3. Factor out common factors on both sides.
  4. Multiply each side by [math](1-r)[/math].
Grade 11 Sequences and Series CCSS: HSA-SSE.B.4

This question is a part of a group with common instructions. View group »

The equation in the third step is found by subtracting the equation from step 2 from the equation in step 1. What happens to all the terms on the right hand side?
  1. They are ignored, because they are all going to be much smaller than either [math]a[/math] or [math]ar^n[/math], depending on whether [math]r[/math] is greater or less than 1.
  2. All but two of them are eliminated by subtraction. Aside from the first term of the first equation and the last term of the second equation, each term in the first equation has an equal term in the second equation, and thus they become n - 2 zeros.
  3. Using the factor theorem, they all cancel out except for [math]a[/math] and [math]ar^n[/math].
  4. Dividing both sides of the equation by [math]ar, ar^2, ... , ar^(n-1)[/math], they all cancel out.
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