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Second Grade (Grade 2) Short Stories (Non-Fiction) Questions

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Grade 2 Food (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.5, RI.2.5

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Which of the following is on the same page as oatmeal crackers?
  1. Penoche
  2. Lemon Pie
  3. English Walnut Pudding
  4. Both a and c
Grade 2 Food (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.2, CCRA.R.10, RI.2.2, RI.2.10
Fill in the blanks to complete the passage.

Have you ever eaten a fortune cookie? A           fortune           cookie is a special type of cookie occasionally served with Chinese food and it has a special surprise hidden inside. Each fortune cookie contains a        slip        of paper that has a special fortune printed on it. The cookies are made in a special pocket-type shape which leaves the perfect space for the paper to fit inside.

Fortune cookies have a place in           history          . During the 14th century, a Taoist priest sent messages to Chinese rebels by hiding them inside moon cakes. In 19th and early 20th century America, Chinese railroad workers gave cakes filled with           holiday           messages to their friends during the holidays. But the modern-day fortune cookie was most likely created not by someone from         China        , but someone from Japan.

Makoto Hagiwara was a restaurant owner in San Francisco. He served fortune           cookies           with tea at his restaurant. To make the cookies, Hagiwara made a basic batter out of flour, sugar, eggs, and water. He would make the dough into circles, bake it, and add the fortune just before it          cooled         . Then he would quickly fold cookie into its popular shape.

Today, fortune cookies are made by machines. Once the cookies are baked, vacuums suck the fortunes into the cookies before the cookies are          folded         . The folding process traps the fortune inside. Some machines even allow people to insert their own fortunes. They have used fortunes for marriage proposal, holiday greetings, and even funny            messages           .
Grade 2 Food (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.2, CCRA.R.10, RI.2.2, RI.2.10
Fill in the blanks to complete the passage.

Have you ever eaten a fortune cookie? A           fortune           cookie is a special type of cookie occasionally served with Chinese food and it has a special            surprise            hidden inside. Each fortune cookie contains a        slip        of paper that has a special fortune printed on it. The cookies are made in a special pocket-type         shape         which leaves the perfect space for the         paper         to fit inside.

Fortune cookies have a place in           history          . During the 14th century, a Taoist priest sent messages to Chinese rebels by hiding them inside moon         cakes        . In 19th and early 20th century America, Chinese railroad workers gave cakes filled with           holiday           messages to their friends during the holidays. But the modern-day fortune cookie was most likely created not by someone from         China        , but someone from Japan.

Makoto Hagiwara was a              restaurant              owner in San Francisco. He served fortune           cookies           with tea at his restaurant. To make the cookies, Hagiwara made a basic batter out of flour,         sugar        , eggs, and water. He would make the dough into circles, bake it, and add the fortune just before it          cooled         . Then he would quickly fold cookie into its popular         shape        .

Today, fortune cookies are made by            machines           . Once the cookies are baked, vacuums suck the fortunes        into        the cookies before the cookies are          folded         . The folding process traps the fortune inside. Some            machines            even allow people to insert their own fortunes. They have used fortunes for marriage proposal, holiday greetings, and even funny            messages           .
Grade 2 Nature and Science (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.3, RI.2.3

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What effect does the egg have on the sidewalk?
  1. It makes it dirty.
  2. It heats it up.
  3. It cools it down.
  4. It cleans it off.
Grade 2 People (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.2, CCRA.R.10, RI.2.2, RI.2.10
Once you start yawning, it's hard to stop.

People        yawn        for many reasons. They yawn when they wake up. They yawn when they go to         sleep        . They yawn        when        they are bored. They yawn when their ears are plugged up. They yawn when they       see       other yawns.

Humans aren't the only             creatures             that yawn. Dogs yawn. Cats        yawn       . Even birds yawn. Fish yawn       too      . Humans can even yawn when they're still in the womb.

What is a yawn? It's a            movement            of the muscles in your chest, mouth, and throat. Yawning helps wet        tiny        air sacs in your         lungs        .

People can't yawn on           command          . When they feel a yawn          coming          on, it's really hard to stop it. Scientists aren't sure why people yawn. Hippocrates was an ancient             scientist            . He thought yawning was a way to remove       bad       air from the lungs. In the 17th century other scientists studied yawning. They thought yawning increased your         heart         rate. They also thought it helped the level of          oxygen          in the blood. Today, scientists think yawning has to do with changing states. You yawn when you go from awake to          asleep         . You yawn when you go from asleep to         awake        . You also may yawn to      go      from alert to bored.

One thing is for certain - yawning is contagious. When you see someone yawn, your         brain         tells you to yawn too. It's a way to help you        feel        what others are feeling.
Grade 2 People (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.2, CCRA.R.10, RI.2.2, RI.2.10
Once you start yawning, it's hard to stop.

People        yawn        for many reasons. They yawn when they wake up. They yawn when they go to sleep. They yawn        when        they are bored. They yawn when their ears are plugged up. They yawn when they see other yawns.

Humans aren't the only             creatures             that yawn. Dogs yawn. Cats yawn. Even birds yawn. Fish yawn       too      . Humans can even yawn when they're still in the womb.

What is a yawn? It's a            movement            of the muscles in your chest, mouth, and throat. Yawning helps wet tiny air sacs in your         lungs        .

People can't yawn on command. When they feel a yawn          coming          on, it's really hard to stop it. Scientists aren't sure why people yawn. Hippocrates was an ancient             scientist            . He thought yawning was a way to remove bad air from the lungs. In the 17th century other scientists studied yawning. They thought yawning increased your         heart         rate. They also thought it helped the level of oxygen in the blood. Today, scientists think yawning has to do with changing states. You yawn when you go from awake to asleep. You yawn when you go from asleep to         awake        . You also may yawn to go from alert to bored.

One thing is for certain - yawning is contagious. When you see someone yawn, your         brain         tells you to yawn too. It's a way to help you feel what others are feeling.
Grade 2 Food (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.5, RI.2.5

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How is the passage organized?
  1. In alphabetical order
  2. In reverse alphabetical order
  3. From English to French words
  4. From shortest to longest
Grade 2 Nature and Science (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.4, RI.2.4

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"It's so hot you can fry an egg on the sidewalk" is...
  1. a fact
  2. an opinion
  3. a saying
  4. a legend
Grade 2 Nature and Science (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.1, RI.2.1

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Where does the smallest flower in the world grow?
  1. In rainforests
  2. In watery areas
  3. In Indonesia
  4. On other plants
Grade 2 Food (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.5, RI.2.5

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This passage is most like a...
  1. Glossary
  2. Cookbook
  3. Recipe card
  4. Index
Grade 2 Nature and Science (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.4, RI.2.4

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Why is the Titan arum called "a corpse flower"?
  1. Because of its size
  2. Because of its smell
  3. Because of its color
  4. Because of its lifespan
Grade 2 Nature and Science (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.3, RI.2.3

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Why won't an egg fry on the sidewalk?
  1. The sidewalk isn't hot enough.
  2. The sidewalk doesn't get enough sun.
  3. The egg spreads out too much.
  4. The egg sticks to the sidewalk.
Grade 2 Nature and Science (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.3, RI.2.3

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Why is the Titan arum not technically the largest flower in the world?
  1. The Rafflesia arnoldii is bigger
  2. It is made up of smaller flowers
  3. Water-meal is bigger
  4. It isn't technically a flower
Grade 2 Nature and Science (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.4, RI.2.4

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What does the word IMITATE mean in the passage?
  1. to jump around
  2. to feel sad
  3. to copy someone
  4. to be playful
Grade 2 Animals (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.1, RI.2.1

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Grade 2 Nature and Science (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.3, RI.2.3

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How does yawning help plugged up ears?
  1. It plugs them more.
  2. It makes them pop.
  3. It helps them hear better.
  4. It causes them to lose hearing.
Grade 2 Nature and Science (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.3, RI.2.3

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How do materials like foil and magnifying glasses help the contestants in the egg frying contest?
  1. They provide a pan for cooking the egg.
  2. They provide extra heat for the egg.
  3. They provide extra heat for the sidewalk.
  4. They provide a plate for serving the egg.
Grade 2 Places (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.2, CCRA.R.10, RI.2.2, RI.2.10
If you look at a picture of the Leaning Tower of Pisa, you might think something is wrong with your eyes. You’d be wrong. There’s           nothing           wrong your eyes, but there is something wrong with the tower. As the name suggests, the Leaning Tower of Pisa is leaning.

Construction on the Leaning Tower of Pisa           started           in 1173. Its foundation was poured on soft subsoil. At first, the tower did not lean because it was not very heavy. The soil was able to support its weight. However, about five         years         after construction began, workers started to       add       the second story. This was too much weight for the soil. One side of the tower started to sink into the soil. This caused the tower to        lean       .

Instead of stopping the building process, the                construction                workers kept on            building           . They did not        know        what was causing the lean. The lean got worse as they kept building. However, after around 100 years of working on the tower, they stopped to fight a       war      . This allowed the tower to settle in the ground. If it had not had time to settle, it would have toppled over. Workers came back after the war and added more to the tower. After around 200         years        , workers finished the tower. It         still         leaned.

In the 1800s, an Italian decided he wanted to show off the tower more. He had workers       dig       a pathway around the base of the tower. However, the workers struck water. This caused a         flood        . It made the tower lean even more.

In the 1930s, Benito Mussolini decided he didn’t want the tower to lean anymore. He thought it was an embarrassment to         Italy        . He had his workers drill         holes         into the foundation. They filled them with concrete. Instead of keeping the tower from leaning, the cement made it lean even        more       .

Around 1990, the Italian government decided the Leaning Tower of Pisa was not safe for visitors anymore. They closed the         tower         for construction. During the construction, they helped decrease the amount of the lean. In 2001, it was open for            visitors            again. In 2008, engineers examined the tower         again        . They had        good        news. The tower was still leaning, but the lean had not changed. That meant the tower was stable. Since the tower is          stable         , it will likely last a long time. However, it will always have its        lean       .
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