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Common Core Standard RI.3.10 Questions

By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grades 2–3 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

You can create printable tests and worksheets from these questions on Common Core standard RI.3.10! Select one or more questions using the checkboxes above each question. Then click the add selected questions to a test button before moving to another page.

Grade 3 Nature and Science (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.2, CCRA.R.10, RI.3.2, RI.3.10
What's the strongest muscle in the human body? That question is actually difficult to answer.

The human        body        has three different kinds of muscles (cardiac, skeletal, and smooth) and there are hundreds of muscles in the        body       . Each muscle works to help make the body          strong          as a whole. However, there are a few muscles that do more        work        than many of the others.

Eye Muscles
The muscles in your eyes, particularly the muscles on the outside of your        eyes        do a lot of work. These external muscles help your eye adjust its position so it can        keep        a steady gaze. They can move over 10,000         times         in an hour. That's a lot of work!

Gluteus Maximus
The gluteus maximus is a         large         muscle. In fact, it's the           largest           in your body. It helps to keep your body upright and            controls            your posture. It also works against gravity, which means it has to be very strong.

Heart
Many people think the         heart         is your strongest muscle because it works the hardest. Your heart pumps blood      24      hours a day. During your lifetime, it can beat over 3 billion         times        . It's what helps keep you         alive        .

Masseter
The masseter is a          muscle          in your jaw. It helps you close your         teeth         with tremendous force.

Soleus
Below your calf muscle is your soleus. This muscle helps you        walk       , run, and dance. It works against gravity to help you         stand         up and requires a lot of            strength            to keep you moving.

Tongue
Your tongue is always at work, even when you think it's not. Your tongue is actually a         group         of muscles. It helps you         speak        , it helps you process foods, and all day long it helps move saliva around in your mouth and        down        your throat.

All of the muscles in your body work very        hard        to help make sure everything runs smoothly. Which muscle do you think is the             strongest             of them all?
Grade 3 Nature and Science (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.2, CCRA.R.10, RI.3.2, RI.3.10
What's the strongest muscle in the human body? That question is actually difficult to answer.

The human        body        has three different kinds of muscles (cardiac, skeletal, and smooth) and there are hundreds of muscles in the body. Each muscle works to help make the body strong as a whole. However, there are a few muscles that do more        work        than many of the others.

Eye Muscles
The muscles in your eyes, particularly the muscles on the outside of your        eyes        do a lot of work. These external muscles help your eye adjust its position so it can keep a steady gaze. They can move over 10,000 times in an hour. That's a lot of work!

Gluteus Maximus
The gluteus maximus is a large muscle. In fact, it's the           largest           in your body. It helps to keep your body upright and controls your posture. It also works against gravity, which means it has to be very strong.

Heart
Many people think the heart is your strongest muscle because it works the hardest. Your heart pumps blood 24 hours a day. During your lifetime, it can beat over 3 billion         times        . It's what helps keep you alive.

Masseter
The masseter is a muscle in your jaw. It helps you close your         teeth         with tremendous force.

Soleus
Below your calf muscle is your soleus. This muscle helps you walk, run, and dance. It works against gravity to help you         stand         up and requires a lot of strength to keep you moving.

Tongue
Your tongue is always at work, even when you think it's not. Your tongue is actually a         group         of muscles. It helps you speak, it helps you process foods, and all day long it helps move saliva around in your mouth and down your throat.

All of the muscles in your body work very hard to help make sure everything runs smoothly. Which muscle do you think is the             strongest             of them all?
Grade 3 Nature and Science (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.2, CCRA.R.10, RI.3.2, RI.3.10
When you look up into the sky, sometimes you can see stars. The number of         stars         you can see depends on the number of clouds in the sky. It also depends on the amount of light pollution. It even depends on the strength of your eyes. In most places, on a clear evening, you can see             thousands             of stars. Some of the stars sit alone in the sky. Others are part of constellations. Whatever you see, it is only a         small         sampling of the stars that exist in the universe.

How many stars are in the universe?

Scientists don't have an exact answer. The universe is made up of            galaxies           . Scientists guess there are over 100 billion galaxies in the universe. Some galaxies are small. Some galaxies are         large        . The number of stars in each galaxy varies, but it's safe to say that each galaxy has at least one star. That means there are over 100 billion stars in the universe.

In fact, there are over 300 billion stars in the            universe           . How do scientists know? Because the galaxy we live in, called the Milky Way, has over 300 billion stars alone. When you look up in the       sky       and see a few thousand stars, you're actually only looking at a small number of the over 300 billion stars in the galaxy and trillions, zillions, or possibly even gazillions of stars in the          entire          universe.
Grade 3 Nature and Science (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.2, CCRA.R.10, RI.3.2, RI.3.10
When you look up into the sky, sometimes you can see stars. The number of         stars         you can see depends on the number of          clouds          in the sky. It also depends on the amount of light pollution. It even depends on the strength of your eyes. In most places, on a clear evening, you can see             thousands             of stars. Some of the stars sit alone in the       sky      . Others are part of constellations. Whatever you see, it is only a         small         sampling of the stars that exist in the universe.

How many stars are in the universe?

Scientists don't have an exact answer. The universe is made up of            galaxies           . Scientists guess there are over 100 billion galaxies in the universe. Some galaxies are small. Some galaxies are         large        . The number of stars in each galaxy varies, but it's        safe        to say that each galaxy has at least one star. That means there are        over        100 billion stars in the universe.

In fact, there are over 300 billion stars in the            universe           . How do scientists know? Because the          galaxy          we live in, called the Milky Way, has over 300 billion         stars         alone. When you look up in the       sky       and see a few thousand stars, you're actually only           looking           at a small number of the over 300 billion stars in the galaxy and trillions, zillions, or possibly even gazillions of stars in the          entire          universe.

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