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Short Stories and Questions about Food

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Grade 2 Food (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.5, RI.2.5

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Which of the following is on the same page as oatmeal crackers?
  1. Penoche
  2. Lemon Pie
  3. English Walnut Pudding
  4. Both a and c
Grade 2 Food (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.5, RI.2.5

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How is the passage organized?
  1. In alphabetical order
  2. In reverse alphabetical order
  3. From English to French words
  4. From shortest to longest
Grade 2 Food (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.5, RI.2.5

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This passage is most like a...
  1. Glossary
  2. Cookbook
  3. Recipe card
  4. Index
Grade 2 Food (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.2, CCRA.R.10, RI.2.2, RI.2.10
Have you ever eaten a fortune cookie? A           fortune           cookie is a special type of cookie occasionally served with Chinese food and it has a special            surprise            hidden inside. Each fortune cookie contains a        slip        of paper that has a special fortune printed on it. The cookies are made in a special pocket-type         shape         which leaves the perfect space for the         paper         to fit inside.

Fortune cookies have a place in           history          . During the 14th century, a Taoist priest sent messages to Chinese rebels by hiding them inside moon         cakes        . In 19th and early 20th century America, Chinese railroad workers gave cakes filled with           holiday           messages to their friends during the holidays. But the modern-day fortune cookie was most likely created not by someone from         China        , but someone from Japan.

Makoto Hagiwara was a              restaurant              owner in San Francisco. He served fortune           cookies           with tea at his restaurant. To make the cookies, Hagiwara made a basic batter out of flour,         sugar        , eggs, and water. He would make the dough into circles, bake it, and add the fortune just before it          cooled         . Then he would quickly fold cookie into its popular         shape        .

Today, fortune cookies are made by            machines           . Once the cookies are baked, vacuums suck the fortunes        into        the cookies before the cookies are          folded         . The folding process traps the fortune inside. Some            machines            even allow people to insert their own fortunes. They have used fortunes for marriage proposal, holiday greetings, and even funny            messages           .
Grade 2 Food (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.2, CCRA.R.10, RI.2.2, RI.2.10
Have you ever eaten a fortune cookie? A           fortune           cookie is a special type of cookie occasionally served with Chinese food and it has a special surprise hidden inside. Each fortune cookie contains a        slip        of paper that has a special fortune printed on it. The cookies are made in a special pocket-type shape which leaves the perfect space for the paper to fit inside.

Fortune cookies have a place in           history          . During the 14th century, a Taoist priest sent messages to Chinese rebels by hiding them inside moon cakes. In 19th and early 20th century America, Chinese railroad workers gave cakes filled with           holiday           messages to their friends during the holidays. But the modern-day fortune cookie was most likely created not by someone from         China        , but someone from Japan.

Makoto Hagiwara was a restaurant owner in San Francisco. He served fortune           cookies           with tea at his restaurant. To make the cookies, Hagiwara made a basic batter out of flour, sugar, eggs, and water. He would make the dough into circles, bake it, and add the fortune just before it          cooled         . Then he would quickly fold cookie into its popular shape.

Today, fortune cookies are made by machines. Once the cookies are baked, vacuums suck the fortunes into the cookies before the cookies are          folded         . The folding process traps the fortune inside. Some machines even allow people to insert their own fortunes. They have used fortunes for marriage proposal, holiday greetings, and even funny            messages           .
Grade 2 Food (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.5, RI.2.5

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This passage is an example of...
  1. A glossary
  2. An index
  3. An instruction manual
  4. A dictionary
Grade 3 Food (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.1, RI.3.1

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Grade 3 Food (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.3, RI.3.3

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Why should you add rose-water to almonds?
  1. To enhance their flavor
  2. To dry them out
  3. To help prevent oil
  4. To make them easier to crush
Grade 3 Food (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.3, RI.3.3

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In the passage, currants are treated most like...
  1. almonds
  2. raisins
  3. butter
  4. puff pastry
Grade 3 Food (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.3, RI.3.3

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In the cornbread recipe, what do you do just before adding the milk?
  1. Add the sugar
  2. Sift the meal, flour, baking-powder, and sugar
  3. Add the egg-yolks
  4. Bake in a hot oven
Grade 3 Food (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.6, RI.3.6

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Grade 2 Food (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.5, RI.2.5

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What do the numbers most likely represent?
  1. Number of recipes
  2. Number of words
  3. Page numbers
  4. Recipe numbers
Grade 3 Food (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.5, RI.3.5

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This passage is most likely from...
  1. A cookbook
  2. A manual
  3. A magazine
  4. A newspaper
Grade 2 Food (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.3, RI.2.3

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Who would most likely use this list of words?
  1. A chef
  2. A teacher
  3. A reader
  4. A translator
Grade 2 Food (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.4, RI.2.4

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Which word is a type of meat?
  1. Brioche
  2. Cannelon
  3. Consommé
  4. Croustades
Grade 2 Food (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.5, RI.2.5

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Grade 2 Food (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.5, RI.2.5

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How is this passage organized?
  1. By page number
  2. In alphabetical order
  3. By popularity
  4. In a random order
Grade 2 Food (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.1, RI.2.1

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In what city were fortune cookies likely invented?
  1. San Francisco
  2. Beijing
  3. China
  4. Japan
Grade 3 Food (Stories) CCSS: CCRA.R.3, RI.3.3

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Who would most likely use this passage?
  1. A scientist
  2. A baker
  3. A child
  4. A teacher
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